If you’re heading to Malaysia on a tiger safari, one of the best places to go looking for the Malayan Tiger is the Taman Negara National Park – widely considered to be one of the finest lowland forest reserves in the whole of Asia. Peninsula Malaysia is a fantastic place to discover a wealth of wildlife and enjoy an absolutely unforgettable natural history holiday. This part of Malaysia is home to rolling hills, lowland forest and mangrove fringed coastlines. The recent government interest in increasing tourism and related economic activity has meant that there has been an extensive amount of infrastructure development, making the country far more accessible to foreign tourists.

Taman Negara

When planning a tiger safari, most people immediately think of India as a destination, but Malaysia also has an incredible amount to offer the keen nature watcher. The Taman Negara (Malay for ‘National Park’) straddles the states of Pahang, Kelantan and Terengganu, and is home to one of the world’s oldest rainforests. The National Park was established during 1938 and 1939 as King George V National Park, during the time that the Malay Peninsula was administered by the British. The three sections of the Taman Negara vary in size from 2,477 km2 (Taman Negara Pahang), to Taman Negara Terengganu – the smallest at just over 850 km2.

An Ecological Tiger Safari?

Taman Negara has developed an enviable reputation as a respected ecotourism destination. As well as a great place to see tigers, visitors can explore the park via the breath-taking canopy walkway high in the trees, the hidden caves and the exciting river rapids. Jungle treks in the Taman Negara open up one of the world’s most diverse wildlife areas, and rock climbers will also find an almost never-ending range of opportunities to indulge their passion.

The area isn’t only ideal for a tiger safari; the reserve is also home to a spectacular array of other animals including the Sumatran Rhinoceros, the Red Junglefowl, the Malayan Gaur, the Asian Elephant, the Great Argus and the Crab-eating Macaque. However, the Malayan Tiger is arguably the jewel in the crown: an endangered species, the numbers of this incredible animal seem to be in decline, but it has become subject to much more concerted conservation efforts in recent times.

The accessible location means that it is possible for visitors to Malaysia to make brief visits to the park in the hope of spotting some rare wildlife in the impressive rainforests; or, for those who want a more well-rounded experience, the opportunity to spend an extended period of time there.

Source by Marissa Ellis-Snow